Author Archives: Quintin Bradley

One third of all homes with planning permission never get built

At least twice as much land is provided every year for housing than homes started on site and more than 30 per cent of homes with planning permission never get built at all.  The number of homes approved for development … Continue reading

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Is planning responsible for the housing crisis?

UK Government ministers continue to blame the planning system for the affordability crisis in housing. They are not alone. Many economists also say that planning restrictions stop house-builders from building the amount of homes we need. In April 2019 economist Christian … Continue reading

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Is building more unaffordable homes the best way to make housing more affordable?

The solution to a housing crisis of affordability is – we are told – to build more homes.  Housing economists agree, however, that we would need to build an unprecedented number of houses to have any effect on prices in … Continue reading

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Why do we keep saying there is a housing shortage?

The real housing crisis is an affordability crisis, so why do we keep saying there is a housing shortage? When we talk about a housing crisis, we always talk about a crisis of under-supply. We all know the mantra: we … Continue reading

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Will building more homes solve the housing crisis?

Do we have a housing crisis of under-supply, or a crisis of affordability? We seem to be confusing the two things. The current government target of building 300,000 new homes a year depends on the assumption that increasing supply will … Continue reading

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The worst vested interest?

In February 2019 the Secretary to the UK Treasury, Liz Truss MP, one of the contenders to replace Theresa May as Prime Minister, described communities objecting to housebuilding as ‘the worst vested interest we’ve got’. Communities resisting development, she said … Continue reading

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The use of direct democracy to decide housing site allocations in English neighbourhoods

My new paper to be published soon in Housing Studies Volume 35, Issue 3 explores the democratic practices through which housing site allocations are made in neighbourhood plans in England. “The production of a neighbourhood plan for housing site allocations … Continue reading

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Research with communities objecting to new house-building

In 2019 I am carrying out national research with groups objecting to housing development. I would like to hear from any community groups who would be interested in taking part in this research through interviews or group discussions. For my … Continue reading

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Green Belt – a capacity to engage

Green Belt is an environmental designation internationally adopted by spatial planning regimes, and famously associated with the arousal of passionately loyal identification. The passions aroused by Green Belt are often disparaged by the planning profession, but the capacity to arouse … Continue reading

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Public support for Green Belt: common rights in countryside access and recreation

Public support for Green Belt is legendary. It is unquestionably the most popular planning policy, and perhaps the only one that is readily recognised and fiercely defended.  This passionate support is often dismissed as sentiment or as an attachment to a … Continue reading

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